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Full text of "Microcosm"

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http://archive.org/details/microcosm1978simm 



MICROCOSM 

1978 



Simmons College Boston, Massachusetts 



Microcosm Staff 



Judith Blacher: Editor, photographer, layout, copy editor, writer, directory, circulation, advertising 
Sarah Brown: Editor, chief photographer, layout 



Cynthia Carter: Writer, circulation 

Marie Coffey: Photographer 

Barbara Eisenberg: Business Manager 

Kim Erickson: Photographer 

Ann Laforge: Writer 

Janet Rapuano: Circulation manager, writer 

Susan Simons: Photographer 

Martha Woodbridge: Cover design, divider pages, layout 



Pam Barnard, Minerva Sprogis, Nancy Tanner, Jody Van Dam, Teresa Young, Nancy Zahka: Contributors 
Virginia Bratton: Faculty advisor 



Microcosm 1 978 was printed by the Hunter Publishing Company whose yearbook representative for Simmons is Dick Swiech. 
Photographs in the portrait section were taken by Guy of Lincoln Studio located in Maiden, Massachusetts. 



A traditional yearbook records events and people of the previous 
year. Microcosm 1978 has done just that and a little bit more. 
We've created some new sections to emphasize what Simmons 
College stands for and has exemplified itself to be for the past 
seventy-five years: A school oriented toward careers for women. 

The section on internships is a preview to the diversity of work we 
can do in a variety of fields. Our profile section points out that each 
of us is an individual and is special as such. It brings to light the 
many interests we have in school and out. Lastly, the visual arts 
section was designed as a showcase for the talented artists and 
photographers at Simmons. 

The Microcosm 1 978 staff wish you the best of luck and hope you 
enjoy the yearbook. 



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In Memoriam 







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Gerry Nadel 
1945-1977 




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Mary Caron 

Simmons College 

Mary is doing an independent study in 

demography in conjunction with the 

math department. 



Jayne Skolnick 

Kendall Company 

Jayne is designing a market research 

study and campaign on a service never 

available before. 







Maria Creavin 

Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller Community 
Health Center 

A nutrition student, Maria performs var- 
ious duties at the health center. 



Catherine Smith 

Harvard School of Public Health 
Cathy, a biology major, is a research as- 
sistant. 




Janet Rapuano 

Simmons Child Study Center 

Janet is working with younger children 

as a student teacher. 



Yasmeen Husain 

Simmons College 

Yasmeen is doing an independent study 

in folk medicine. 





Betty Farina 

Mass. Mental Health Center 
Betty, a human services major, is an as- 
sistant to the director of volunteers. 




Deborah Truran 

Cutter School 

Debbie works as a teacher's aide in 

the Arlington school system. 



Linda Harriman 

Boston Rent Control Administration 

As a research assistant, Linda finds that 

her work relates well to her economics 

concentration. 



Nancy Selig 

First Night, Inc. 

A public relations assistant, Nancy helps 

out during a celebration in preparation 

for New Year's Eve. 





10 





Lisa Lamb 
Sheraton Hotel 

To get an overall view of how a hotel 
runs, Lisa is placed in different depart- 
ments at the Sheraton. 



Sheila Davis 

Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare 

Sheila, whose major is government- 
sociology, is a clerk at the JFK building. 



11 



Rhonda Frazier 

Boston Zoological Society, Franklin 

Park Zoo 

Rhonda assists the public relations 

manager at the Franklin Park Zoo. 




Yvonne Graham 

Brookline Schools 

As a teacher's aide, Yvonne fulfills her 

education requirement. 




12 




Domna Karagogeos 

Harvard Biological Laboratories 

"I am working on a research project 

focusing on specific biochemical 

changes in Diosophila cells due to the 

hormone ecdysone." 




Robin Gross 
Simmons College 

"My independent study is 'the role of 
competition in determining the intensity 
of natural selection'; this is a problem 
involving evolution and genetics. I am 
using the fruit fly as my experimental 
organism." 



13 




Susan Greene 
Simmons College 

Susan is doing an independent study in 
art under the direction of Dana Chan- 
dler, Associate Professor of Art. 




Kathryn Sank 

Filene's 

Kathryn works within all divisions of the 

personnel department. 




14 



Robinette Dasher 
Simmons College 

Robinette is doing an independent study 
on Puerto Rico: independence, state- 
hood or commonwealth states. 





Robin Portman 

Department of Consumer Protection 
Robin deals with consumers' problems 
in connection with her sociology- 
american studies concentration. 



15 




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Florence Adejuwon 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Florence, a medical technology major, 

fulfills her internship requirement in a 

lab of the chemistry department at the 

Beth Israel. 



Rene Levine 
Department of Labor 
Rene spends her internship in the JFK 
building as an employment develop- 
ment specialist. 




16 




Ann McNulty 

WRKO General , Channel 7 

Ann is an assistant producer for 

"Womankind." 



Susan Johanson 

Simmons College 

As a biology major, Susan is applying 

her knowledge to her independent study 

at Simmons. 




17 



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Mildred Kimbrel 

State House 

Mildred, whose major is government, 

works as a legislative intern. 




Lisa Elkins 

Paine Webber 

A finance major, Lisa works as a stock 

broker. 




18 




Caryn Bray 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Caryn is doing an independent research 

project in breast cancer. 




Pamela Gilbert 

Filene's 

Pam has entered into the advertising 

training program at Filene's. 



19 




Joanne Kaberidis 
Simmons College 

Joanne works with the terminals per- 
forming programming research. 



Terry Farmer 

Boston Arts Group 

A public relations and advertising 

major, Terry deals with the publicity 

and advertising for the Boston Arts 

Group. 




20 




Patricia Desmond 
Simmons College 

A finance major, Pat has worked with 
Professor Parente on an independent 
study and has a job in the alumnae of- 
fice. 



Martha Monahan 
Boston State Hospital 
"I am presently conducting a study 
which involves mental assessment of al- 
coholics." Martha, a research associate 
at the sleep and dream lab, hopes to 
become a clinical psychologist. 




21 



Jean Fried 

A & A Marking Systems 

Jean uses her graphic talents in mak 

ing rubber stamps. 



Andrea Riff 
Simmons College 

Andrea is doing independent re- 
search in enzymatic disolution of 
rabbit intervertebral discs (slipped 
disc therapy). 




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Gail Gordon 
Filene's 

Gail, a management-psychology 
major, works as a salesperson to ful- 
fill her intership requirement. 



Cathy Gersin 

Sidney Farber Cancer Center 
Cathy works as a diet aide for her 
field work. 




23 




Patricia McGrory 
Charles River Associates 
Pat is a research assistant dealing with 
the economic impact of occupational 
licensing and the expansion of an in- 
dustrial park project. 



Allison Moore 
Simmons College 

Allison is working with Ms. Elgin, Assis- 
tant Professor of Philosophy, on an in- 
dependent study in philosophy. 




24 




Susan St. Onge 

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 
Susan, a management-finance-eco- 
nomics major, works as a financial 
analyst. 



Emeline Gaster 

Runkle School 

Emeline, an elementary education 

major, works as a student teacher. 




25 





Susan Parsons 

Lindemann Mental Health Center 
Susan's work involves counseling chil- 
dren. 



Theresa Alford 
Tenants Development Corp. 
Theresa uses her internship base as a 
model and resource center for her hon- 
ors thesis on the social services in the 
South End. 



26 



Patricia Kelly 

New England Aquarium 

Pat works in the research department on 

her own project for an independent 

study for the chemistry department at 

Simmons. 



Eileen Gordon 
Runkle School 

Eileen is a student teacher at this Brook- 
line school. 





27 




Maude Riva 

Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) 
Maude is producing a videotape to 
complement an ICA exhibit. 




Lisa Campbell 

WBZ-TV, Channel 4 

Lisa, a news intern, works as an assistant 

to the producers of First Four News. 



28 





Barbara Farnham 

The Kennedy Center 

At the Youth Services Division, Barbara 

gives drug and vocational counseling 

along with doing outreach work. 



Cheryl Garthwait 

Cambridge Forum 

Cheryl is a public relations assistant for 

this prestigious organization. 



29 




Peggy Trounstine 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Peggy is a research assistant at the 

hypertension education project. 



Lee Ann Davis 

Planned Parenthood 

A nursing student, Lee Ann lectures at 

various meetings as a representative for 

Planned Parenthood. 




30 




Sheryl Levitt 

Simmons Child Study Center 
An early childhood major, Sheryl stu- 
dent teaches. 



Holly Dammert 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 
Holly works in the public information 
office designing brochures. 




31 



Cynthia Lewis 

Harvard Medical School 

For her independent study, Cindy is 

researching circadian rhythms — 

menstrual synchrony. 




Brenda English 

Big Sister Association 

A communications-psychology 

major, Brenda spends a lot of 

her time as a social worker for 

the Big Sister Association. 




32 







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34 




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EDUCATORS 



35 



To the Class of 1978: 




It gives me great pleasure to participate with the 
Microcosm staff in their very important annual task 
of capturing, and thereby helping define, the spirit 
of Simmons College. 

One of George Orwell's most penetrating in- 
sights was that what remains is history. After we all 
have gone our ways, Microcosm will remain as the 
record of who we all were and what we all thought 
about in 1977-1978. 

We will look at the pictures and say "Did I ever 
really look like that?" or "What strange things we 
did back then." And the real, as always, will con- 
found the remembered. Which is why it is so im- 
portant that we have a Microcosm and why the 
staff bears so heavy a burden. "Are these our most 
important concerns?" "Do these pictures show us 
as we really are?" 

So we should honor the Microcosm staff and its 
task; they are our translators to the future. 

William J. Holmes 



36 



"What do you want to be when you grow up?" How many times have we been asked that 
question, and how many times have we answered it without giving that answer any thought? 

My answer to that question changed many times as I matured. I wanted to skate in a roller 
derby; then I wanted to teach junior high school mathematics; then I decided that high school 
counseling would be just the right thing. Now I am a college administrator and I am still 
thinking about the future. 

I am a career woman and I am confident that the women of the Class of '78 also will be 
career women. 

My definition of the phrase "Career Woman" is as follows: she sees her life as a series of 
choices that she will make, not chance happenings that will befall her. She is a woman that 
chooses a lifestyle that places her work, her marital status and living arrangements, her 
hobbies and interests, her intellectual talents, and her dreams and aspirations into moral and 
ethical harmony. 

It is my guess that each of you will read Microcosm only about a dozen times in your 
lifetime. These will be times when you want to remember, to reflect upon your life and the 
care or neglect you have given to your life choices. My hope for each of you is that Simmons 
has helped you gain the knowledge, skill, and courage to choose wisely. 

Charlotte M. Morocco 




37 




AFRO-AMERICAN 
STUDIES 

Afro-American Studies offers a unique 
vantage point from which to examine a 
large and important cultural group in 
the United States comprised of people 
who share a history and culture different 
in a number of important respects from 
the rest of the population. 

Education should be a process of 
coming to know one's self and having 
the ability to understand and cope with 
one's environs. Without exposure to the 
Afro-American experience, black stu- 
dents cannot formally learn about them- 
selves, and white students cannot learn 
to live with people unlike themselves. 



Seated from left to right: Mark I. Solomon; Elizabeth Rawlins; Reginald L. Jackson, and Lawrence 
Carter, acting coordinator. 



ART AND MUSIC 

The Art and Music Department allows 
art students to investigate their interests 
in art history and studio art, along with 
combining their interests in other fields 
such as Psychology, Communications 
and English. 

For the music majors, who are offered 
concentrations in applied music and 
music history, the opportunity to take 
classes at The New England Conserva- 
tory is available. 

Tom Wallace, chairperson of the de- 
partment, says, "The courses are diver- 
sified in order to accommodate students 
with a wide range of interests." Intern- 
ships and independent studies are a 
valuable part of the student's training. A 
student is free to proceed along the lines 
she has deemed interesting. 




From left to right: Thomas Wallace, chairperson; Robert E. Cronquist and 
Robert Oppenheim. Not pictured: Eric Lustig and Dana C. Chandler. 



38 



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Seated from left to right: David Webb, Karen Loehr and Martha D. Berliner. Standing from left to right: 
Richard P. Nickerson; Elizabeth A. Weiant; Anne E. Coghlan, coordinator for the health sciences and 
chairperson of the department and Everett L. Tuttle. 



BIOLOGY 

Undergraduate education in biology 
provides preparation for an immediate 
profession or further study in graduate 
school. "The most important compo- 
nent to prepare you for either of the two 
goes back a thousand years ago," states 
Anne Coghlan, chairperson. "You don't 
graduate until you do your own 
project." Simmons has had this re- 
quirement for many years so that a stu- 
dent can have experience before she 
goes out into the working world. 

"Our students tend not to be the 
technician, rather the right hand person, 
the co-author and eventually the person 
who gets going and runs things," she 
adds. 

The biology department faculty are a 
prime example of this. Each member 
along with their teaching respon- 
sibilities has research projects ranging 
from studies at Woods Hole marine 
biological lab to work at General Foods 
in search of new sources of protein. 

"What we do out there flows back to 
the Simmons Community," Coghlan 
concluded. 



CHEMISTRY 

With the guidance of James Piper, 
department chairperson, the chemistry 
staff is keeping active by working on a 
joint expansion program with Mas- 
sachusetts College of Pharmacy (MCP). 
Under the proposed plan, a student 
would attend Simmons for three years, 
and MCP for two more years in order to 
receive a B.S. in chemistry from Sim- 
mons and a B.S. in pharmacy from 
MCP. This would greatly increase the 
science offerings at Simmons and would 
also increase enrollment at the College 
of Pharmacy, making the venture agree- 
able to both schools. 

Faculty members are working on their 
independent research projects. Each of 
the staff members has published papers, 
ranging on topics from computer sci- 
ence to educational experimentation. 




Front row from left to right: Phyllis A. Brauner and Iclal S. Hartman. Back row from left to right: James 
Piper, chairperson; Leonard J. Soltzberg; Jerry A. Bell; Peter C. Bowers and Adrienne S. Dey. Not 
pictured: Carolyn G. Spodick. 



39 



COMMUNICATIONS 

The Communications Department 
has grown considerably over the past 
few years and with its growth comes 
changes. Print media has been a staple 
of the department with students success- 
fully completing internships at newspa- 
pers, magazines and various company's 
publications. As the department ex- 
pands a greater emphasis is being put on 
the visuals and the job opportunities 
film and video might offer. Students 
have had experiences with Channels 4, 
5, 7 and 2. 

Mr. Poole, chairperson of the depart- 
ment, states, "The communications 
field is crowded, under pressure and 
highly competitive, but in general things 
are looking up for Simmons women." 





From left to right: Reginald L. Jackson; Alden Poole, acting chairperson; Homer Jenks; Virginia Bratton; 
Charles Ball; Robert F. White; Kathryn Furlong and William Patton. Not pictured: Margaret Bailey, 
Richard Bartlett, Stacy Greenspan, Louise Jamieson and Alden Wood. 




From left to right: Harriet S. Tolpin; David Molnar; Robert B. Wallace; William A. Darity and Barbara 
A. Sawtelle, acting chairperson. 



ECONOMICS 

"We're very conscious of the fact that 
economics can be usefully integrated in 
other subject areas," said Barbara Saw- 
telle, acting chairperson. 

The broad range of staff interests ena- 
bles the department to be so versatile. 
Sawtelle is particularly interested in in- 
dustry and women's work history. 
Donald Sherk, chairperson is working as 
an international economist with the De- 
partment of the Treasury in Washington, 
D.C. The economics of health care is of 
special interest to Harriet Tolpin, while 
Robert Wallace specializes in urban 
economics and economic methodol- 
ogy. New staff member David Molnar is 
interested in labor economics and the 
development of economic thought. 
Part-timers Sandy Darrity, interested in 
economic development; Edward 
Whitacre, a specialist in data resources; 
Monique Garrity, an international 
economist and Judith Bentcover, who 
teaches principles of economics, round 
out the department. 



40 



EDUCATION 

"The Education Department sees it- 
self in terms of training women to serve 
individuals in a broader perspective 
than several years ago. Teaching chil- 
dren in public schools is only one part 
of human services. We are providing 
training for interested students in re- 
sponse to needs of our society on com- 
munity and state levels," states Joan 
Pine, acting chairperson for the depart- 
ment. 

An undergraduate can concentrate on 
many different levels of education. 
There is secondary, elementary, special, 
and early childhood education as well 
as human services. The department 
hopes to develop an interdepartmental 
coordination committee so that the con- 
tent of the education, for the students, is 
consistent with the demands of the 
schools in which they teach. 



' .. Ml I 




Seated from left to right: B.J. Lates, Alice Van Deusen, Lydia Smith and Elizabeth Rawlins. Standing 
from left to right: Joel S. Weinberg; Georgia T. Noble; Joan Pine, acting chairperson and Kathleen D. 
Lyman. Not pictured: John S. Robinson, Barbara Harrison, Marvin Lew and Debra Mesch. 




Pictured: George Nitchie, chairperson. Not pictured: William 
Holmes, Richard Sterne, Charles L' Homme, Lawrence Langer, 
Richard Freedman, David Perry, David Gullette, John Perry, 
William Manly, Pamela Bromberg, Nellie McKay, Constance 
Lewis and Wylie Sypher. 



ENGLISH 

The humanities, according to George 
W. Nitchie, chairperson of the depart- 
ment, seek to understand what it means 
to be human, through studying literature 
that shows what it has been like to be 
human. The department tries to convey 
the meaning of humanity by encourag- 
ing all students to become familiar with 
literature through the variety of subject 
matter included in the English curricu- 
lum. 

Nellie Y. McKay completed her doc- 
torate at Harvard University and plans 
to turn her dissertation into a book. 

Age of Atrocity: Death in Modern 
Literature is the title of Lawrence 
Langer's latest book. 

Richard Freedman continues his ca- 
reer as a book reviewer for the New 
York Times and other publications. 

David Perry will be returning after a 
sabbatical with a second doctorate, re- 
ceived from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 



41 



FOREIGN 

LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES 

The emphasis in the Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures Department is on 
the re-evaluation of bracketed courses 
in order to respond to students new in- 
terests and needs, while maintaining a 
rigorous and respectable curriculum. 

According to James Newman, de- 
partment chairperson, the courses this 
year were reviewed not only to attract 
more language concentrators, but also 
to reaffirm the balance between profes- 
sional and humanities courses for the 
general student body. 

Among the new courses offered are 
an independent study on Women in 
Latin American Literature, and an intro- 
duction to Translation course which 
concentrates on the written rather than 
the aural-oral aspects of Spanish. 

Along with these additions are one 
full-time and two part-time French in- 
structors as well as one full-time and 
one part-time Spanish instructor. 




Seated from left to right: Carol Taylor, Susan M. Keane, Martha Krow-Lucal, Mary J. Treacy, Charles R. 
Mackey, Nancy Lopez-Balboa. Standing from left to right: Nancy Hall; Don H. McKeen; Louise G. 
Cohen; Ingrid Rogers; Raquel H. Ferguson; Annie P. Geoghegan and James Newman, department 
chairperson. 




GOVERNMENT 

With three full-time members this 
year, the Government Department was 
able to take a good look at course offer- 
ings and decide whether or not they 
were appropriate. 

Carroll Miles, chairperson, shares 
with the other department members the 
opinion that all college graduates 
should have at least a minimal under- 
standing of government. With this in 
mind, the department reviewed the 
course offerings and worked out a cur- 
riculum which provides the maximum 
use of faculty talents. 

Debbie Miner, a new addition to the 
department, is currently expanding her 
doctoral dissertation on United States 
Policy Makers Assumptions about 
South East Asia in 1941 into a book. 

Cynthia Hamilton is finishing her 
thesis at Boston University. 



Seated from left to right: Carroll F. Miles, chairperson; Deborah Miner and Cynthia M. Hamilton. 



42 



HISTORY 

The History Department continues to 
offer courses which provide students 
with insights into the contemporary 
world situation and the persisting ways 
of man. 

Despite the loss of a few faculty 
members, the department is still able to 
provide some of the more popular 
classes such as Colonial Boston and His- 
tory of the Family. 

Professor Solomon has spent the last 
summer in Greece working on a man- 
uscript about the relationship histori- 
cally between the white radical move- 
ment and the black community, and 
Henry Halko, chairperson of the de- 
partment is taking a sabbatical. 




Seated from left to right: Henry J. Halko, chairperson; John C. Hunter; Richard Lyman and Mark I. 
Solomon. Not pictured: Laurie Crumpacker and Kenneth Edison. 




MANAGEMENT 

The Management Department offers 
courses that form frameworks for ca- 
reers ranging from retailing, to market- 
ing and to finance. A good example is 
the retailing abroad course, taught by 
Milton Shuch, department chairperson. 
It gives students an opportunity to see 
the fashion business in Europe. 

The department wants to reach not 
only those students interested in man- 
agement as a career, but would like to 
see every student take advantage of the 
practical knowledge that management 
courses have to offer. 



Seated from left to right: Woodrow W. Baldwin; Milton L. Shuch, chairperson; Leo Parente; Bruce W. 
Warren and Laurence M. Onie. 



43 



MATHEMATICS 

"We can prepare people to do pure 
math in preparation for graduate school 
or for jobs in computer science, statis- 
tics or research," states David Browder, 
chairperson. "Students can work for 
local industries such as banks and in- 
surance companies," he adds. Also, 
there are math classes for those who are 
interested in math as an "intellectual 
discipline, art form or game." 

The Mathematics Club in conjunction 
with the department has had speakers 
come to Simmons and has had math 
learning films which show how mathe- 
matics work in a visual way. A particu- 
lar box office breaker was entitled 
"Turning a Sphere Inside Out." 




Seated from left to right: David S. Browder, chairperson; Robert N. Goldman; John D. Garberson; 
Margaret Menzin; W. David Novak and Margaret Niehaus. 




NURSING 

The Department of Nursing believes 
that a liberal arts education along with a 
nursing education is essential for the 
professional development of the nurse 
and that the quality of her practice is 
enhanced by knowledge acquired from 
a wide base in the arts and sciences. 

The first experimental elective, "Pre- 
ceptorship in Interdisciplinary Health 
Care," was started in '77 . The depart- 
ment, which was recently reaccredited, 
hopes to continue to develop elective 
options for students and to strengthen 
the independent study component of 
the department. 

Chairperson Phyllis Moore states, "A 
major goal of the department is to con- 
tinue to provide for the most effective 
way of open communication between 
students and faculty." 



Top photo from left to right: Maria N. Bueche and Celeste Hurley. Bottom photo from left to right: Lois 
Schoppee, Doris Nelson, Mary B. Gardner, Ann E. Lord, Rosemary Czaplinski and Phyllis Moore, 
chairperson. 



44 



NUTRITION 

In September, 1977, the Nutrition 
Department took on a new look. The 
department moved its headquarters to a 
brand new facility in the Science 
Center. The move symbolizes the end of 
the old Domestic Science department 
and the advent of a new Nutrition de- 
partment. 

Patricia Kreutler, head of the depart- 
ment, would like to see some more 
changes to complement the depart- 
ment's new face. While the dietetic pre- 
paratory program will always be the 
main thrust of the Simmons program, 
she feels that other aspects, such as 
socio-economics of nutrition, would be 
helpful in making a well-rounded edu- 
cation. 

Faculty members are busy at school 
and away. Rena Mendelson is cur- 
rently working on her Ph.D. at Har- 
vard's school of Public Health, while 
Nancy Herbold and Doctor Kreutler are 
active in community nutrition affairs. 




Seated from left to right: Patricia A. Kreutler, chairperson; Marion Mason; Nancie H. Herbold; 
Katherine Bevacqua and Rena A. Mendelson. 




Pictured from left to right: Catherine Elgin; Ynhui Park and Carol Ochs, chairperson. 



PHILOSOPHY 

The Philosophy Department encour- 
ages students to synthesize philosoph- 
ical thought into their careers and 
everyday life simply by questioning ide- 
als and beliefs. 

Chairperson Carol Ochs will be 
strengthening the interdisciplinary side 
of philosophy next year by designing a 
new curriculum for the department 
while a Fellow of the National 
Humanities Institute at the University of 
Chicago. While on sabbatical, Ochs 
will prepare courses to make philoso- 
phy a more integral part of all Simmons' 
majors. 

Founder of the Boston chapter of the 
Society of Women in Philosophy, Ochs 
has published her first book, Behind the 
Sex of God. 

The Philosophy Forum, under the di- 
rection of Ynhui Park, has continued to 
play an active, vital role at Simmons, 
supplying students and faculty with a 
chance to meet and discuss ideas, val- 
ues and current issues in philosophy. 



45 



PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

Two semesters of physical education 
are one of the many requirements for 
graduation from Simmons. Courses 
ranging from self-defense to yoga are of- 
fered each year and Director of Physical 
Education Doris Olmstead and special 
instructors Helaine Berley and Mary 
Staley try to provide the best physical 
education programs with our existing 
facilities. 

One way Simmons is coping with the 
problem of limited space for phys. ed. is 
to make arrangements with outside 
sources for sports like ice skating and 
swimming, which require facilities that 
the college does not have. This enables 
students to choose from a wider variety 
of activities that would otherwise be 
impossible. 



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Pictured from left to right: Doris Olmstead, chairperson and 
Mary Staley. 





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PHYSICAL THERAPY 

"As a faculty we are interested in pro- 
viding opportunities in the program to 
help our students meet society's expec- 
tations for delivery of quality health care 
in light of the changing and expanding 
roles of the physical therapist," states 
Linda Fetters, chairperson. The physical 
therapy department has a diversity of in- 
structors from hospitals such as Mass. 
General Hospital, Children's Hospital 
and Peter Bent Brigham, and a clinical 
practice requirement to fulfill this phi- 
losophy. 

If you want to be a physical therapy 
major you have to declare in your soph- 
omore year and be willing to work until 
December of your graduating year. But 
the rigorous program is well worth it. 
Linda Fetters says, "The profession is 
young and mobile particularly in met- 
ropolitan Boston. Physical therapy 
graduates won't have problems finding 
jobs." 



Linda Fetters, chairperson 



46 



PHYSICS 

The Physics Department prepares its 
students in all subfields of physics, with 
intensified laboratory work and com- 
puter integration from laboratory data 
analysis. Edward Prenowitz, department 
chairperson, summarizes the depart- 
ment viewpoint: "We feel that you can't 
learn physics without messing around in 
the lab, so we greatly emphasize that." 

Physics received a substantial portion 
of the CAUSE grant awarded to Sim- 
mons. Ed Prenowitz and Robert Vernon 
are concentrating on this. Two graphics 
terminals are now in operation in the 
Science Building. 

Although a small department, Physics 
is very active and aware of continuous 
changes and additions to theories of the 
physical universe. Many options are 
open to the interested student — all of 
which amply prepare the student for 
graduate school, research work, or 
teaching. 




Pictured from left to right: Edward Prenowitz, chairperson; Robert C. Vernon and Michael Rice. 




From left to right: Diane T. Coulopoulos, chairperson; Donald W. Thomas; Teresa Carterette and 
Barbara F. Gentile. Peter Castle, Lillian Grayson, Helen Moore and Alice Locicero are not pictured. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

The Psychology Department assists 
seniors in their preparation for gradua- 
tion and their futures. One way they do 
this is by opening a variety of options to 
psychology majors to work in the real 
world. 

Field work placement settings have 
been at the Cambridge-Somerville Men- 
tal Health Center, the V.A. Hospital, the 
Hebrew Rehabilitation Center and the 
Children's Hospital Medical Center. In- 
ternships have included work with State 
Representatives of Massachusetts and 
with the Crimson Travel Company's 
personnel department. Students also 
have the chance to choose an indepen- 
dent study and work with the faculty on 
their project. 



47 



SOCIOLOGY 



A statement from the Sociology De- 
partment reads, "Our goal is to develop 
analytical and intellectual perspectives 
which will allow the student to under- 
stand and explain the bases and con- 
sequences of various forms of social be- 
havior. The department's goal is 
achieved through three interrelated 
areas: theory, methodology and com- 
parative study." 

Steve London, chairperson says, "We 
discuss what goals the students have 
and provide structure to be used 
throughout their career." 




From left to right: Stephen D. London, chairperson; Elaine Hagopian and Rachel Forman. 



ADMINISTRATION 

President 

Assistant to the President 

Coordinator for Humanities 

Coordinator for Health Sciences 

Coordinator for Social and Professional 

Sciences and Dean of Graduate Studies and 

Program Development 

Treasurer 

Dean 

Acting Associate Dean 

Vice President for Public Affairs 

Business Manager 

Registrar 

Director of Admission 

Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Director of the J. Garton Needham Career 

Planning and Counseling Center 

Director of Continuing Education 

Director of Development 

Director of Health 

Director of Libraries 

Director of Placement 

Director of Public Information 

Director of Residence 

Director of Sponsored Programs 

Director of Student Activities 

Director of Student Employment 

Director of Student Financial Aid 

Director of Supportive Instr. Services 



William J. Holmes 

Priscilla L. McKee 

Charles Mackey 

Anne Coghlan 



John S. Robinson 

M. Don Sargent 

Charlotte M. Morocco 

Elizabeth Rawlins 

Paul R. Miller 

Walter E. Steere, Jr. 

Sherwood A. Barrow 

Linda Cox 

Mary Jane Doherty 

Jonathon Ehrenworth 

Caroline H. Pooler 

Bernice J. Poutas 

Dr. Marjorie E. Readdy 

Dorothy C. Senghas 

Joann O'D. Carroll 

Margaret A. Loeb 

Nancy C. Stoll 

Cheryl Quist 

Donna Sillman 

F. Ann Shaw 

Patricia Keegan 

Helen B. Moore 



48 




PORTRAITS 



49 



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Marcia L. Abbott 




Sarah H. Alander 





Nike A. Adejuwon 





Theresa L. Alford 




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Cathy Adelman 




Carol H. Aloupis 




Jayne M. Amodio 



Barbara W. Anderson 



Christina J. Anderson 



50 




Sally M. Andrews 




Janet F. Bailey 





Sara J. Andrews 




Rosemary E. Balberchak 





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Paulette T. Beaudoin 




Dorothy A. Bell 



Susan M. Bergstresser 



Judith Blacher 



51 






Heidi Blanch 



Kathryn Blass 



Barbara Blatchly 






Patricia E. Bobola 



Susan R. Bonchi 



Sue Borkum 






Sara Born 



52 



Catherine Botindari 



Gloria A. Bouchard 




Lena I. Boyer 




Susan E. Brighton 





Lesley L. Braun 




Julianne Brissette 





Caryn L. Bray 




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Valeda J. Britton 



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Winsome Brown 



Jane M. Buchanan 



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Lori K. Burns 




Sheryl H. Calish 





Marie T. Bushfan 




Mary A. Campanario 




Lisa A. Campbell 



54 



Patricia J. Campus 



Mary E. Caron 






Cynthia A. Carter 



Barbara A. Cauchon 



Lorraine T. Chalas 




Mumtaz H. Champsi 






Michele Ciciola 




Barbara Citronberg 



Marie K. Coffey 



Julie Connery 



55 




Linda L. Crawford 






Janet M. Cremone 




Lorene A. Cronin 



Lynn Cummiskey 



Josephine Damico 






Holly B. Dammert 



56 



Robinette M. Dasher 



Joan M. Datz 




Lee Ann Davis 




Wendy L. Demille 





Sheila M. Davis 



Patricia A. Desmond 






Patricia L. Degen 




Dawn Dickinson 




Angela Diverdi 



Deborah A. Doo 



Suzanne A. Dubose 



57 






Margaret J. Dye 



Brenda L. English 



Kim E. Erickson 







Betty J. Farina 



Terry D. Farmer 



Barbara S. Farnham 




Patricia A. Fleming 




Nieves P. Flores 




Gail A. Forbes 



58 




Rhonda M. Frazier 







Jean S. Fried 





Jean Gardner 





Susan M. Free 




Ellen Garnick 




i«i 



Cheryl A. Garthwait 



Emeline Gaster 



Cathy G. Gersin 



59 










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61 








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Drusilla M. Gibson 



Pamela S. Gilbert 



Kathleen M. Gill 




Pauline L. Glazier 





Joyce S. Glen 





Katja Goldman 




Lynda D. Goldman 



Coleen D. Gooch 



Eileen M. Gordon 



62 




Gail D. Gordon 




Jill Greenthal 




K/ w 




Virginia A. Green 




Betsy S. Gross 





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Susan J. Greene 




Robin G. Gross 




Janet E. Guenther 



Cynthia C. Gummere 



Ayodele Hala 



63 




ail 



Ann-Marie Hall 




Judith L. Harsfield 





Linda Harriman 




Susan C. Hathaway 





Patrice M. Harris 




Sharon A. Heard 




Cheryl A. Heitz 



Trumilla Hinnant 



Kathy A. Hobbs 



64 




P* 111! 



Gail M. Holliday 








Clare Hurley 





Alma J. Howell 




Yasmeen Husain 





Holly J. Hudson 




Sarah Jancosek 




Susie Y. Jenkins 



Ann S. Jenusaitis 



Pamela A. Jochym 



65 




Susan M. Johanson 




Leslie Junda 





Judith N. Jones 




Joanne A. Kaberidis 





Lori B. Joyce 




Domna S. Karagogeos 




Cindy B. Keller 



Ellen Kelly 



Patricia A. Kelly 



66 




Mildred J. Kimbrel 





Glendine Kingsbury 



m i ««■■ mm mm 

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Joan Kirschner 




Karen A. Knowles 



Katherine Koo 



Wendy L. Kosovsky 






Lisa M. Lamb 



Lisa-Marie Lanzillo 



Diane C. Larossa 



67 




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Lucia L. Latham 



Marie T. Leber 



Jane R. LeBlanc 




Gertrude M. LeClaire 





Shou Wan Leong 



Monica B. Levine 





Cynthia R. Leveille 




Wendy H. Levine 



68 




Sheryl A. Levitt 




Michelle Lopez 


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Cynthia Lewis 




Jill F. Magoon 





Joanne Lincoln 




Marilyn L. Maione 



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Melanie R. Mamishian 



Renee A. Marchand 



Patricia A. Marino 



69 




Susan L. Marona 




Patricia McAfee 





Lucy B. Masters 




Margaret McCaig 





Deborah Mayerson 




Joyce M. McCarthy 




Yvonne M. Graham-McColl 



Rosemary McCormack 



Patricia A. McGrory 



70 




Carol A. McHugh 




Michelle K. McNulty 





Joan M. McLaughlin 




Donna L. Menno 









Ann T. McNulty 




Esther Mhlanga 




Robin S. Milder 



Joan D. Miller 



Rhonda D. Mills 



71 






72 






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73 




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Sharon Moidel 





Martha J. Monahan 





Marilyn A. Monroe 




Allison S. Moore 



Leslie A. Munro 



Ann W. Murphy 




Donna J. Murphy 




Mary K. Murphy 




Melanie A. Murphy 



74 




Susan E. Murphy 




Suzanne M. Nuttall 



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Anne M. Neelon 




Mary H. O'Brien 




Marcia L. Osterman 



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Ann A. Nickolds 




Janet M. O'Flaherty 




Margaret J. Palkovic 



75 




Corrine M. Palmer 





Ekaterini Papagiannopoulos 





Helen Papakyrikos 




Susan E. Parsons 



Gail I. Pfeifer 



Joanne M. Phelan 




Valerie Philbrick 




Cathy Phillips 




Catherine L. Pickle 



76 




Mary A. Poole 




Cynthia A. Quinn 





Robin B. Portman 



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Janet A. Rapuano 





Robin Portnoi 




Anita M. Reinold 




Denise C. Richardson 



Andrea M. Riff 



Maude A. Riva 



77 




Jeannine E. Rochat 




Victoria R. Rugo 




2 






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Karen L. Rose 




Phyllis A. Russell 





Susan A. Rounds 




Arlene Sadek 




Elizabeth S. Safe 



Susan A. St. Onge 



Syrmo C. Salemi 



78 




Carol R. Salloway 





Gail Sandiford 




Lillian J. Saxe 





Kathryn S. Sank 




Suzanne D. Schneiderman 




Laura S. Schonberger 



Emily W. Scott 



Abby G. Sears 



79 




Janis H. Segal 




Jeanne C. Serafin 





Nancy A. Seideman 




Rhonda B. Seresky 







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Carmen G. Sheareer 




Carol A. Sherman 



Linda Shermont 



Robin B. Shipman 



80 



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Amy J. Short 




Lynne C. Simmons 





Wendy B. Silver 




Jayne Skolnick 





Linda A. Silverman 




Kimberly Slavin 





Catherine L. Smith 



Toby R. Steinberg 



Alice Steinmuller 



81 




Hazel M. Stevens 




Lois H. Sullivan 





Mary E. Sullivan 





Ellen M. Sullivan 



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Stephanie Tarantino 




Sharon L. Tarr 



Diana Teller 



Rozena Thomas 



82 






Anne J. Thruelsen 



Sarah M. Tobin 



Barbara A. Tomorowitz 




Anne Tragert 





Deborah J. Truran 





Cheryl Tucker 




Abigail H. Turner 



Elizabeth K. Turner 



Julie M. Ulwick 



83 




Angela M. Valvo 




Norann E. Warner 





Susan J. Vander Velde 




Nancy G. Watson 





Janice K. Wagner 




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Karen B. Wegiel 



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84 




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Roberta Wilson 





Linda D. Willey 




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Laura D. Williams 




Martha D. Woodbridge 




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profiles 



87 



In her work and in her hobbies, Linda 
Wenc thrives on the outdoors. As a stu- 
dent interested in environmental biology, 
Linda is working on a classification system 
of plants including trees and wildflowers. 
She plans to photograph, dry and mount 
them so that biology classes in the future 
will have a key for identifying various 
plant lives. 

For relaxation, Linda enjoys cross coun- 
try skiing, ice skating, mountain climbing 
and jogging. Her enthusiasm for activity is 
exemplified in her role as president of the 
outing club. 

Linda best sums up herself by saying, "I 
really love the outdoors!" 















'.*«<* 









t - TV, ' » -^ zl j ***** - - 



88 





"When I started college, the men 
studied science and math and made 
money, while the women brought cul- 
ture into the home," explained Dory 
Bell, a joint chemistry and math major. 

Dory, who is married to chemistry 
professor Jerry Bell and is the mother of 
two sons, received a bachelor's degree 
in English from Radcliffe College and a 
master's degree in English from the Uni- 
versity of California at Riverside. She 
had just passed her doctoral exams 
when the family decided to move to 
Boston. 

"I got into chemistry because I 
wanted to be a food chemist," she said. 
"It was as much of a surprise to me as 
anyone else when I realized I love it," 
she added. Dory intends to pursue a 
doctorate in physical organic chemistry 
at Brandeis University and would 
someday like to teach. 

In her spare time Dory plays the cello 
and performs with the Arlington 
Philharmonic Orchestra. "I started play- 
ing violin when I was seven years old, 
but developed a neck condition that 
made it impossible to play," she said. At 
one time Dory had considered making 
music a career. 

According to Dory, she and Jerry 
enjoy going out to dinner and being to- 
gether. Without the support of her hus- 
band and children she says, "I couldn't 
have done it." "Going to school again 
has been fun, a lot more fun than staying 
home." 




"I used to detest hospitals. I was 
scared," states Sarah Alander. 

Luckily, Sarah has gotten over her 
fear and will undoubtedly prove to be 
a dedicated nurse. "You know how to 
handle the physiology of a sickness 
but you have to remember that a per- 



son's problems don't stop when they 
come into a hospital. You have to give 
a person who is ill, respect and dig- 
nity," she says. 

Sarah's hobbies include judo, in 
which she has a brown belt, and 
growing plants. 





90 



There is something different about 
Mumtaz Champsi. In a college where 
students place a great deal of emphasis 
on careers and money-making-majors, 
Mumtaz views education as a growing 
and learning experience. "Education is 
there for us to enjoy, to offer us diversity 
and to widen our horizons," she says. 

As an international student Mumtaz 
has encounters many problems at Sim- 
mons. "I don't feel that the needs of 
international students are adequately 
met. I also find the atmosphere at times 
insular, apathetic and lacking in diver- 
sity. But, as anything in life if you want 
to make it an interesting place you can. 
There are some excellent professors 
here who are very intellectually 
stimulating," she states. 

In her senior year Mumtaz was able to 
do an internship with the Arthur D. Little 
consulting company in Cambridge on 
an input-output energy analysis project. 

Following graduation she would like 
to attend graduate school. "I can't say 
what I'd like to do because things 
change so quickly. Eventually I'd like to 
work somewhere that I can realize my 
full potential." 






91 




One of Linda Tsang's most impor- 
tant events during her college career 
was a semester at the University of 
Madiid. What better way to learn her 
major, Spanish, than to experience it. 
"The students at the University of 
Madrid all spoke English but the pro- 
fessors allowed you to speak only 
Spanish in the classroom," she says. 
Linda goes on to explain the various 
politics in Spain that affected the cul- 
tural life there. "There's not too much 
cultural exchange going on. There's a 
sudden flux of books and movies as 
political parties change. I tried to get 
to know the people but it was very 
hard," she remarks. 

Linda enjoys reading, music and 
taking walks. She'll be attending the 
Harvard School of Education in the 
Fall. 




92 





^^Hr ^ ^^^^^^^^^^Bl 










The interaction of health, exercise 
and diet plays an important role in 
Meredith Hoblock's life. As a nutrition 
major at Simmons she studied that in- 
teraction; as a performing dancer 
she's experienced it. 

While at Simmons, Meredith 
worked with the Dancers with Becky 
Arnold Company, performing at the 
Hatch Shell and other places in Bos- 
ton. Meredith first studied ballet when 
she was seven years old, but it was 
after attending Western Washington 
State College, Goddard College in 
Vermont and coming to Boston that 
she began to take jazz dance classes. 
Becky Arnold saw her dance and 
asked her to be in the company. "We 
rehearse twice a week for two and a 
half or three hours. I enjoy being able 
to dance, it's such good exercise," she 
said. "I taught dancing before coming 
to Boston and I've performed often," 
she commented, "but I never consi- 
dered a career in dancing because it's 
such a rough life." 

Meredith is aiming toward a career 
as a registered dietitian and hopes to 
gain some clinical experience through 
a hospital internship after graduation, 
before deciding between clinical or 
community work. "I'm looking for- 
ward to working with nutrition," she 
said, "but I can never give up dancing 
— it's my passion." 



93 




Three years ago Jayne Brigida de- 
bated accepting a summer job in a 
small shop called Pilgrim's Progress in 
Plymouth, Mass. Today she owns Pil- 
grim's Progress and says "it is exactly 
what I've always wanted to do." 

Jayne bought the shop the summer 
after her junior year under the au- 
spices of the P.P. Bridge Corporation, 
which she formed with members of 
her family. The shop carries unique 
clothing lines along with jeans and 
handmade items. 

"I spend a lot of time in the shop 
now. Owning a store is time and 
energy consuming. I never realized all 
there was to know about running a 
business, but I'm learning, sometimes 
the hard way," she says. Jayne says 
she didn't miss regular classwork. She 
completed a retailing internship in her 
own shop last fall and took one class 
and an independent study in the 
spring to meet credit requirements. 

Jayne, who lives near and loves the 
beach, plays tennis and skis in her 
spare time. She has a part-time sales- 
woman and two sisters who willingly 
come in to cover the store for her 
when she has to leave, which isn't 
very often. 

"I wouldn't want to be doing any- 
thing else right now. Who would? It's 
like Christmas every day opening 
packages that come in and getting to 
look at all those clothes!" 





94 





Apathy is a constant problem at 
Simmons but people like Trish Flem- 
ing are trying to put an end to it. As 
president of the Student Government 
Association (SGA), Trish is trying to do 
things rather than complain. She says, 
"Everything is put on a few people. I 
try to get people involved but I can't 
go around and shake everybody's 
shoulders. I know that I worked at it 
and I did my best." 

Trish would eventually like to use 
her superb leadership skills as the first 
woman president of the United States. 



"I think being a politician would be 
kind of fun and also there's never 
been a woman president," she states. 
"Having a woman as the president 
may bring a different point of view to 
the country and could cause some 
change," she adds. 

When she isn't running for office, 
Trish enjoys cooking, bowling and 
dancing. She travels a lot on buses 
across the country and has what she 
calls her "most prized collection" of 
two hundred tacky postcards. 



95 




For Patricia Bobola, coming to 
Simmons was the result of a "crazy, 
last minute decision" which turned 
out to be a good experience and 
served to strengthen her desire to be 
an artist. 

"When I graduated from Leicester 
Junior College, I applied to art schools 
but I wasn't sure if I should really be 
an artist. At the last minute I applied 
as a psychology major at Simmons 
hoping to go into art therapy. During 
my first semester I was very unhappy 
because I felt I was going against 
something that was a part of me, so I 
decided to become an art major. At 
least once a year I seem to go through 
the same conflict, wondering, 
shouldn't I be studying something that 
will result in a financially dependable 
career. For an ambitious person like 
myself it takes a lot of soul searching 
to be a professional artist," she says. 

While in school, Pat paints as much 
as she can spending up to six hours in 
one day painting, drawing and print- 
ing. In her spare time she enjoys mak- 
ing her own clothes. Pat also plays the 
guitar and at one time had considered 
playing professionally. 

Right now though she is devoting 
her energy to being an artist. "Art — 
it's hard to explain my feelings about 
it. It's my work, not just a pleasant 
pastime and it takes a certain dedica- 
tion," she says. 




96 



X. 



!*?» 



.■-■■'-' :. 






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■ 



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David Browder, chairperson of the 
math department writes, "Glendine is 
an accomplished oboe player who 
transferred to Simmons from New En- 
gland Conservatory in 1974. Her 
achievement in mathematics has 
grown to the point that she is viewed 
by our department as one of the best 
concentrators we have had in several 
years." 

"She has served on the mathemat- 
ics liaison and, last year, was an ex- 
tremely effective president of the math 
club. By virtue of her enthusiasm and 
leadership, her activities and ac- 
complishments, Glendine Kingsbury 
has indicated exceptional promise for 
success." 



Shou Wan Leong was born in 
China, lived in Hong Kong and then 
came to the United States. She's a 
Spanish-finance major who likes to 
work with the public and has done so 
as a translater for the unemployment 
division of security located in Gov- 
ernment Center. She knows what it's 
like to face the language barrier and 
has helped break down that barrier in 
her position. "Chinese people had 
problems understanding. I'd interview 
claims and explain policies," she 
says. 

"Simmons is a small college. If I 
want attention I can get as much as I 
can. The most important thing is not 
your marks, but what you learn. It's 
not good to compare yourself with 
other people," she remarks. "We all 
have different abilities and 
backgrounds." 





98 






"I am extremely determined and I 
have tons of perserverence." With that 
statement Valeda Britton sums up not 
only her four years at Simmons but the 
years before that have brought her this 
far and will bring her to her dream: A 
lawyer working with minorities and the 
economically disadvantaged. 

Valeda spent a summer working with 
the elderly for the Boston Housing Au- 
thority. As a social worker trying to ob- 
tain homemaker services at a time when 
Massachusetts was cutting back funds, 
Valeda was awakened to the worlds of 
poverty, helplessness and bureaucratic 
red tape. She says, "The housing com- 
plex was completely filled with elderly 
people. A lot of them either couldn't get 
out of the house or wouldn't. One 
couple had been mugged four times and 
were afraid to go to the market right ac- 
ross the street. They ate liver every day. I 
ran into blocks continually with the 
state in trying to get help for these peo- 
ple." 

The oldest of six children, Valeda has 
had to use all of her perserverence and 
determination to make it this far. "When 
I was younger," she says, "my grand- 
mother would tell me that someday I 
would have all of the things she never 
had through my education, 'because 
once you get that knowledge, no one 
can ever take it away.' " 



99 






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100 



Chris Anderson's work as a candy 
striper, nurses' aide and swimming in- 
structor for handicapped children 
sparked her interest in physical therapy. 

That interest has remained and 
strengthened during Chris's years as a 
physical therapy student at Simmons. "I 
love the program and feel that I will be 
happy in the profession," she said. A 
clinical experience at the Deaconness 
Hospital and the Lahey Clinic Founda- 
tion during her senior year got Chris in- 
terested in eventually pursuing chest 
physical therapy, mainly because of its 
importance to the patient's comfort and 
ability to recover successfully from 
surgery. 

Keeping up with school work and 
other activities has kept Chris busy dur- 
ing her Simmons years, although she 
somehow found time to keep up her 
hobbies of swimming, ice skating, target 
pistol shooting and jogging. 

"Even though there wasn't much time 
to spare," she said, "seeing progress in 
my first patients made it all worth- 
while." 




Being a medical technology student is 
tough. Marilyn Monroe is a med tech 
and she says, "People don't recognize 
us. We don't get a vacation. You can't 
work because there's no time for 
another job." Even so Marilyn enjoys 
her profession and hopes to get a mas- 
ter's degree in either hospital adminis- 
tration or business administration. "We 
have no problems getting jobs because 
lots of people don't have the knowledge 
that medical technologists have," she 
says. 

In the small amount of spare time that 
she has, Marilyn likes to get lost in 
stores, read books and work on her em- 
broidery. She plans to get married in 
September and will be moving to Con- 
necticut. She states, "I'm not over en- 
thused about Boston, but culturally lots 
of things are happening." 





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they believe ii s tht. way of tne future. 

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cause present energy is based upon finite r 
sources as fossil fuels and nuclear substance 
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nerative energy systems is the only means 
survival in the future. Yet. behind the verbo: 
'ationalization is a fundamentally solid and ba: 
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Cindy Carter would like to be a 
newspaper reporter. Her work 
proves that she's off to a good 
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As a legislative assistant for the 
Massachusetts Black Caucus, Gail 
Holliday worked with education, 
health and welfare problems of the 
third world community in Boston. 

A government major at Simmons, 
Gail would like to work in interna- 
tional relations, possibly for the U.S. 
foreign service. "I'm interested in 
working in a foreign country and 
would like to be able to help Ameri- 
can tourists who encounter problems 
with the law or need assistance in 
general while in that country," she 
says. 

Gail has traveled in the United 
States and Europe, and would pre- 
fer to work in Spain or a Latin Ameri- 
can country. She would like to con- 
tinue her studies in graduate school, 
possibly at Brown University or 
George Washington University. 

Gail plays the guitar, enjoys listen- 
ing to music, writes poetry, plays ten- 
nis and has tried skiing. 

While she says that the Simmons 
community is not as close as it might 
be, Gail says she has grown close to 
some of her professors. "That's a great 
thing about Simmons, the professors 
I've had were really top notch." 



An Impression 

Once upon a time we met 

How strange our paths should cross 

Two of day and night divided by an endless ocean, with our 

divided and endless dreams. 

Somehow through space and time our paths have crossed 

We with our souls of day and night have become one soul 

For eternity perhaps. 

Like wet clay is my mind, 

for it will hold an impression of you forever. 

by Gail Marie Holliday 



103 



Entering Simmons as a communica- 
tions major, Susan Marona soon ven- 
tured out into the co-ed atmospheres of 
Dartmouth and M.I.T. and whet her ap- 
petite for a career doing research in 
bio-medical engineering with an elec- 
trical foundation. 

"When I came back to Simmons I 
found a lot of girls were branching out 
and were excited about what they were 
doing. I think a women's college is 
good. It usually has a more supportive 
atmosphere for women. I felt my educa- 
tion at Simmons was very worthwhile 
even though I was in a science that is 
not a strong point here." 

Susan was able to work at Harvard 
School of Public Health for her intern- 
ship. There she researched particle 
clearance in lungs. 

She plans to get her master's degree 
and then enter the field of engineering. 
"It's going to be full of men for sure 
which may be good or bad — good be- 
cause people who are hiring will be in- 
clined to hire a woman — but I don't 
want to fall back on my sex. It's a good 
field and I want to be in it!" 





104 



/ 





When we were all receiving our di- 
plomas, Wendy Levine watched on. As 
an elementary and special education 
major, Wendy decided to join the five 
year program at Simmons to earn her 
bachelor of arts and master's degree in 
teaching. "I always wanted to be a 
teacher since I was a little girl. I had a 
teacher in fifth grade who told me that 
some day I'd be a teacher," she says. 

Wendy has had experience as a stu- 
dent teacher at Jamaica Plain High 
School. She notes, "There are sixteen 
year olds who don't know how to read. 
There's a big alcoholism problem and 
one fifteen year old is having her third 
baby." 

About Simmons she says, "I'm really 
glad I came here. I like the smallness of 
the school. You can go to a teacher if 
you have a problem. You're a person 
not a number. I came here to learn and I 
feel I got a good education." 

When Wendy receives her diplomas, 
her friends will watch on. 




105 




Phyllis Russell is director of training 
and development at Children's Hospi- 
tal. She's been in this position for four 
years. Somehow in between her full 
time working hours, Phyllis has man- 
aged to attend classes at Simmons as a 
management major. "I have to change 
roles from here (her job) and school," 
she says. "In college you're being taught 
for the future. In the world you're taught 
things that are relevant now," she 
comments. 

"It's really sad that in the working 
world so many people don't like their 
work. You stay eight hours every day, 
every week. You should love it," she 
says. "Getting out into the world doesn't 
mean that you have to stop being a 
woman and stop being humanistic. You 
need people. You need to trust," she 
adds. 

Phyllis enjoys the field of human re- 
sources development and talking with 
her can show you why. 




106 





Professor Donald W. Thomas of the 
psychology department writes, "Mary 
O'Brien is an exceptionally capable 
student who is doing a double major in 
nutrition and psychology and has com- 
bined her background in these areas to 
develop a weight loss program." 

Mary has also worked at the Veterans 
Administration Outpatient Clinic where 
she's been observing and assisting in pa- 
tient counseling and evaluation with 
dieticians. She's been working on a spe- 
cial project for which she's researched 
the nutritional needs of drug addicts 
during rehabilitation. Mary is using the 
information to prepare a basic nutrition 
course for use at the drug dependence 
treatment center, a special program run 
by the VA. 

Mary's hobbies include skiing and 
swimming. She's a part-time guitar 
teacher and works at a music shop in 
Pea body. 




107 






108 




CTIVITIE6 



109 




Simmons College 

75th Anniversary 

Honors Convocation 




October 21, 1977 




110 






"^jik. 




111 





112 









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113 






114 



Octoberfest 






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115 



Father-Daughter 
Weekend 




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116 






117 






118 




Spring Spree 






119 




Pousette-Dart Band 





120 






Casino Night 




Pub 
Party 



121 





tlMIIIII 



Chorale 



IIIIIIIIM 





122 









123 






124 




1 I 





125 






Helium Mime Show 



126 





Simmons Drama Society 




"The Good Woman of Setzuan 



r t 



127 




Senior-Faculty Banquet 





128 






129 




Senior- 
Alumnae 
Party 



May 
Day 





130 




Student 
Awards 
Ceremony 





131 





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Commencement 




132 






133 



• • 








134 




VISUAL ART& 



135 




Janet Cremone 



136 




Rebecca White 



137 




Karen Wallace 



138 




Lyne Vieira 



139 






V, 









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Nancy Andrew 




Nancy Andrew 



141 



4L • 









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Debbie Rooney 



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Maria Marasco 



143 






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Vwcy 14 



Janis Segal 



144 




Martha Woodbridge 



145 




Wendy Rice 



146 




m 



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SWCKI 



Kathy Sawicki 



148 




Kathy Sawicki 



149 




Sarah Brown 



150 




M»* 







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■ . ■■ 



<t*a 




Maria Marasco 



151 




Elisabeth Witte 



152 




Martha Gasparini 



153 




Trina Schule 



154 






§6& fe 




CANDIDA 



155 




Simmons 

Hall 



Morse 
Hall 




156 




Mesick 
Hall 



Evans 
Hall 




157 



South 
Hall 





Arnold 
Hall 



158 



Smith 
Hall 








Dix 
Hall 



159 




North 
Hall 



Hillel gets together 
for a bagel break. 




160 




The Student 
Government 
Association (SGA) 
gather in their 
plush executive 
office. 



It looks like 
Leadership 
Weekend was a lot 
of fun. 




161 



The Janus staff lays 
out all the news 
that's fit to print. 





Members of the 
Palestinian-Israeli 
Conflict 

symposium relax 
at a dinner. 



162 



Mothers and 
daughters gather 
for a brunch. 





Bill Baird speaks 
out. 



Dance, dance, 
dance at the 
annual commuter 
snowball. 




163 






164 





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165 






167 





168 





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169 






170 





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171 






172 






173 






174 





175 






176 






177 




Joan McLaughlin braves the Boston Marathon. 




IQECTODY 



179 



MARCIA L. ABBOTT 
16 Old Marlboro Road 
Concord, MA 01742 
Psychology 



SALLY M. ANDREWS 
131 Berkshire Drive 
Westfield, MA 01085 
Management, Finance 



SUSAN M. BERGSTRESSER 
10 George Road 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Communications, Public Relations 



NIKE A. ADEJUWON 
6 Akinola Street 
Ighobi-lkorodu Raod 
Lagos, Nigeria 
Medical Technology 



SARA J. ANDREWS 
325 South Union Street 
Spencerport, NY 14559 
Psychology, Spanish 



JUDITH BLACHER 
1 1 Henshaw Street 
Brighton, MA 02135 
Public Relations, Advertising 



CATHY ADELMAN 
Mars Hill, ME 04758 
Finance, Management 



M. JAYNE AUSANKA 
606 Oil and Gas Building 
Wichita Falls, TX 76301 
Communications 



HEIDI BLANCH 
16 Alden Lane 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Nursing 



SARAH H. ALANDER 
318 Autumn Avenue 
Duxbury, MA 02332 
Nursing, Psychology 



SALLY B. BAER 
P.O. Box 255 
Cottage 318 
Sea Island, GA 31561 
Management, Finance 



KATHRYN BLASS 
6 Casale Drive 
Warren, NJ 07060 
Biology 



THERESA L. ALFORD 
59 Tennis Road 
Mattapan, MA 02126 
Sociology 



JANET F. BAILEY 
839 Main Street 
Latrobe, PA 1 5650 
English 



BARBARA BLATCHLY 
300 Carpenter Avenue 
Groton, NY 13073 
Physical Therapy 



CAROL H. ALOUPIS 
170 Suffolk Avenue 
Revere, MA 02 1 5 1 
Physical Therapy 



ROSEMARY E. BALBERCHAK 
67 Eaton Street 
Stratford, CT 06497 
Management 



PATRICIA E. BOBOLA 
14 Linda Avenue 
Chicopee, MA 01013 
Art 



RHODA E. ALPER 
125 Holland Road 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Management 



LINDA BARTNISKI 
94 Bourne Street 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 



SUSAN R. BONCHI 
32 Sylvan Place 
Longmeadow, MA 01 106 
Communications 



JAYNE M. AMODIO 
1 1 1 Oakwood Drive 
New Britain, CT 06052 
Economics, Management, Finance 



PAULETTE T. BEAUDOIN 
28 Center Street 
Segreganset, MA 02773 
Communications 



SUE BORKUM 
20 Ashmont Road 
Wellesley, MA 02181 
Psychology 



BARBARA W. ANDERSON 
993 Massachussetts Avenue #108 
Arlington, MA 02174 
Communications, Art 



DOROTHY A. BELL 
1 7 Morton Street 
Newton Center, MA 02159 
Chemistry, Math 



SARA BORN 

1123 North Marshall Street 

Allentown, PA 18104 

Nursing 



CHRISTINA J. ANDERSON 
43 Fernwood Avenue 
Bradford, MA 01830 
Physical Therapy 



CAROLE M. BERG 
281 Highland Avenue 
Randolph, MA 02368 
Nursing 



CATHERINE BOTINDARI 
16 Payson Terrace 
Belmont, MA 02178 
Government 



180 



GLORIA A. BOUCHARD 
66 Pleasant Street 
Fort Kent, ME 04743 



SARAH BROWN 
25 Haley Road 
Marblehead, MA 01945 
Advertising 



LISA A. CAMPBELL 
81 Forest Hills Drive 
East Dennis, MA 02641 
Communications, Management 



ROSEMARY M. BOURGUET 
90 Colonial Parkway 
Manhasset, NY 11030 
Economics 



WINSOME BROWN 
25 Brookford Street 
Dorchester, MA 02125 
Management 



PATRICIA j. CAMPUS 
6 Currier Park 
Ipswich, MA 01938 
Psychology 



NANCY J. BOWMER 
50 Pinesbridge Road 
Ossining, NY 10562 
Government 



JANE M. BUCHANAN 
24 Chestnut Hill 
Greenfield, MA 01301 
Sociology, Communications 



MARY E. CARON 
157 Parker Street 
Lowell, MA 01851 
Mathematics 



LENA I. BOYER 
P.O. Box 68 
Wheeler Road 
Hollis, NH 03049 
Nutrition 



SARAH E. BULLOCK 
36 Crispus Attucks Place 
Roxbury, MA 02119 
Nursing 



CYNTHIA A. CARTER 
331 Mt. Wayte Avenue 
Framingham, MA 01701 
Communications 



LESLEY L. BRAUN 
5 Kingston Drive 
Livingston, NJ 07039 
Nursing 



LORI K. BURNS 
12612 Tartan Lane 
Tantallon, MD 20022 
Management, French 



BARBARA A. CAUCHON 
945 Union Street 
North Marshfield, MA 02059 
Philosophy, Health Care Services 



CARYN L. BRAY 
135 Woodhaven Drive 
Avon, CT 06001 
Biology, Chemistry 



MARIE T. BUSHFAN 

890 Roxbury Street 

Roxbury, MA 02119 

Elementary and Special Education 



LORRAINE T. CHALAS 
39 Cleveland Road 
Wellesley, MA 02181 
Home Economics Education 



SUSAN E. BRIGHTON 
4A Louisburg Square 
Boston, MA 02108 
Finance, Sociology 



HOLLY C. BYTHEWOOD 
1101 Dale Drive 
Silver Spring, MD 20015 
Management, Finance 



MUMTAZ H. CHAMPSI 
222 Pleasant Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Economics, Philosophy 



JAYNE P. BRIGIDA 
132 Eliot Street 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 
Retail Management 



SHERYL H. CALISH 
8341 SW 47 Street 
Miami, FL 33155 
Nutrition 



MARY CHEN 
602 National Court 
Higashi Azabu 2-2-5 
Minato-Ku Tokyo, Japan 
Mathematics, Economics 



JULIANNE BRISSETTE 
168 Florence Street 
Melrose, MA 02176 
Nursing 



MARY A. CAMPANARIO 
204 Park Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 
Elementary Education, Spanish 



MARIA C. CHRISTOPHER 
54 Farm Road 
Sherborn, MA 01 770 
Philosophy 



VALEDA J. BRITTON 
71 Milford Street 
Medway, MA 02053 
Spanish, History 



CAROLINE C. CAMPBELL 
10 Cranberry Lane 
Dover, MA 02030 
Communications 



MICHELE CICIOLA 
593 Navaho Trail Drive 
Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417 
Nursing 



181 



BARBARA CITRONBERG 
1 5 Beechwood Lane 
Fairfield, CT 06430 
Nursing 



ROBINETTE M. DASHER 
246 N 59 Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19139 
Government, Sociology 



ANGELA DIVERDI 
5 Elaine Street 
Shrewsbury, MA 01545 
Physical Therapy 



MARIE K. COFFEY 
29 Delta Street 
Hyannis, MA 02601 
Communications 



JOAN M. DATZ 
Woodland Avenue 
Mullica Hill, NJ 08062 
Physical Therapy 



JEAN E. DONKIN 
42 Signal Hill Road 
Madigon, CT 06443 



JULIE CONNERY 
Box 155 RR1 
Kent, CT 06757 
Physical Therapy 



LEE ANN DAVIS 
36 Salem Street 
Wakefield, MA 01880 
Nursing 



DEBORAH A. DOO 
29 Merrifield Avenue 
Watertown, MA 02172 
Physical Therapy 



LINDA L. CRAWFORD 
12 Checkerberry Circle 
Sudbury, MA 01776 
Nursing 



SHEILA M. DAVIS 
21 Lyon Street 
New Haven, CT 06511 
Government, Sociology 



SUZANNE A. DUBOSE 
2408 Salceda Drive 
Northbrook, IL 60062 
Management, Government 



MARIA B. CREAVIN 
30 Ridge Road 
Milton, MA 02186 
Nutrition 



PATRICIA L. DEGEN 
Baechtonbuehl Strasse 15 
6006 Luzern, Switzerland 
Human Services 



MARGARET J. DYE 
25 Smithshire Estates 
Andover, MA 01810 
Nursing 



JANET M. CREMONE 

56 Adams Street 

Maiden, MA 02148 

Public Relations, Communications 



DIANE DE LA BEGASSIERE 
373 Centre Island Road 
Oyster Bay, NY 
Communications 



BRENDA L. ENGLISH 
Main Street 
Monroe, ME 04951 
Communications, Psychology 



LORENE A. CRONIN 
50 Warren Street Apt. 214 
Peabody, MA 01960 
Physical Therapy 



WENDY L. DEMILLE 
90 Pine Street 
Manchester, MA 01944 
History 



KIM E. ERICKSON 
18724 Ridgewood Road 
Wayzata, MN 55391 
Communications 



LYNN CUMMISKEY 
Box 696 

Henniker, NH 03242 
Physical Therapy 



PATRICIA A. DESMOND 
214 Lynn Fells Parkway 
Melrose, MA. 02176 
Management, Finance 



BETTY J. FARINA 
1 105 Pontiac Avenue 
Cranston, Rl 02920 
Human Services 



JOSEPHINE DAMICO 
50 Norwich Circle 
Medford, MA 02155 
Biology 



MARLA E. DIAMOND 
137 Avon Place 
New Milford, NJ 07646 
History, Secondary Education 



TERRY D. FARMER 
1719 H Street NE Apt. 1 
Washington, DC 20002 
Public Relations, Advertising 



HOLLY B. DAMMERT 
4030 Lytle Woods Place 
Cincinnati, OH 45227 
Communications 



DAWN DICKINSON 
61 Quint Avenue Apt. 9 
Allston, MA 02134 
Sociology 



BARBARA S. FARNHAM 
1 5 Rockridge Road 
Old Saybrook, CT 06475 
Human Services 



182 



KATHLEEN J. FENTON 
83 Ashland Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 
Nursing 



JEAN GARDNER 
83 Clifton Road 
Milton, MA 02186 
Advertising, Public Relations 



KATJA GOLDMAN 
138 Hemlock Road 
Manhasset, NY 11030 
Nutrition 



LISA FLATHER 

55 Main Street Apt. 11105 

Roosevelt Island, NY 10044 

English 



ELLEN GARNICK 
41 Manomet Avenue 
Hull, MA 02045 
Medical Technology 



LYNDA D. GOLDMAN 
19 Albert Road 
Peabody, MA 01960 
Mathematics, Finance 



PATRICIA A. FLEMING 
3127 N 81 Place 
Scottsdale, AZ 85251 
Economics, Government 



CHERYL A. GARTHWAIT 
1282 Rice Avenue 
Cheshire, CT 06410 
Communications 



COLEEN D. GOOCH 
4900 Jameson Street 
Cincinnati, OH 45227 
Physical Therapy 



NIEVES P. FLORES 

P.O. Box 384 

Agana, Guam 96910 

Elementary and Special Education 



EMELINE GASTER 
26 Banbury Lane 
Bloomfield, CT 06002 
Elementary Education 



EILEEN M. GORDON 
19 Goslee Drive 
Manchester, CT 06040 
Psychology, Elementary Education 



GAIL A. FORBES 

1 99 Mansfield Street 

New Haven, CT 06511 

Special and Elementary Education 



CATHY G. GERSIN 
242 Cornell Street 
New Bedford, MA 02740 
Nutrition 



GAIL D. GORDON 
Pen Bay Acres 
Rockland, ME 04841 
Psychology, Management 



RHONDA M. FRAZIER 

c/o Axon, 93 Briarcliff Drive So. 

Ossining, NY 10956 

Advertising 



DRUSILLA M. GIBSON 
54 Highland Avenue 
Morristown, NJ 07960 
Communications 



CHERYL L. GRANT 
321 1 Wallace Avenue 
Bronx, NY 10467 
Sociology, Human Services 



PAMELA FREDERICKSON 
433 Sixth Street 
Traverse City, Ml 49684 
French 



PAMELA S. GILBERT 
4701 Willard Avenue 
Chevy Chase, MD 20015 
Advertising, Management 



VIRGINIA A. GREEN 
1 1 5 Lyman Road 
Milton, MA 02186 
Physical Therapy 



SUSAN M. FREE 
43 Travis Road 
Natick, MA 01760 
Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. GILL 
1095 Washington Street 
East Weymouth, MA 02189 
Physical Therapy 



SUSAN J. GREENE 
262 Freeman Parkway 
Providence, Rl 02906 
Elementary Education 



ELIZABETH A. FREEDMAN 
400 Commonwealth Avenue #302 
Boston, MA 02215 
English, Finance 



PAULINE L. GLAZIER 

3505 Crayton Road 

Naples, FL 33940 

Elementary and Special Education 



JILL GREENTHAL 
5365 Middlecrest Road 
Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90274 



JEAN S. FRIED 
Aberdeen Farm 
Staatsburg, NY 12580 
Communciations, Management 



JOYCE S. GLEN 

19 Hawthorne Circle 

Peabody, MA 01960 

Elementary Education, Psychology 



BETSY S. GROSS 
25 Edge Hill Road 
Brookline, MA 02146 
English 



183 



ROBIN G. GROSS 

186 Kennedy Drive Apt. 1 1 

Maiden, MA 02148 

Biology 



CHERYL A. HEITZ 

44 Middlesex Street 

Winchester, MA 01890 

French, Elementary and Secondary 

Education 



CLARE HURLEY 
1 6 Eaton Street 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Philosophy 



JANET E. GUENTHER 
24 Neck Road 
Lancaster, MA 01523 
Biology 



BROOKS HENDRIE 
Templewick Road 
Mendham, NJ 07945 
Retail Management 



YASMEEN HUSAIN 
P.O. Box 180 
Alkohobar, Saudi Arabia 
Chemistry, Biology 



CYNTHIA C. GUMMERE 
89 Cider Mill Road 
Glastonbury, CT 06033 
Special and Elementary Education 



TRUMILLA HINNANT 
25 Gaylord Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 
Education, Human Services 



SARAH JANCOSEK 
179 Sydney Street 
Dorchester, MA 02125 
Philosophy, History 



AYODELE HALA 
52 Parkton Road 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 
Nursing 



KATHY A. HOBBS 
51 Maple Avenue 
Farmington, ME 04938 
Physical Therapy 



SUSIE Y. JENKINS 
25 Withington Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 
Nursing 



ANN-MARIE HALL 
34 Day Street 
North Easton, MA 02356 
Elementary Education 



MEREDITH L. HOBLOCK 
14 Yarmouth Street 
Boston, MA 02116 
Nutrition 



ANN S. JENUSAITIS 
Watertown Road 
Middlebury, CT 06762 
Nursing 



LINDA HARRIMAN 
12 Hilltop Road 
Dover, MA 02030 
Mathematics, Economics 



GAIL M. HOLLIDAY 
98 Southworth Court 
Stoughton, MA 02072 
Government 



PAMELA A. JOCHYM 
10 Arizona Ranch Apt. 1 
Arlington, MA 02174 
Retail Management 



PATRICE M. HARRIS 
21 Bailey Street 
Somerville, MA 02143 
Elementary and Special Education 



ALMA J. HOWELL 
12 Algonquin Street #3 
Dorchester, MA 02124 
Nursing 



SUSAN M. JOHANSON 
40 Lloyd Street 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Biology 



JUDITH L. HARSFIELD 
53 Joyce Street 
East Falmouth, MA 
Human Services 



HOLLY J. HUDSON 
804 Fernwood Street 
Emmaus, PA 18049 
Management 



AMY B. JOHNSON 
53 Spruce Drive 
Fair Haven, NJ 
Economics 



SUSAN C. HATHAWAY 
463 Hart Street 
Dighton, MA 02715 
Nursing 



CYNTHIA A. HUNT 
1 29 Wakefield Street 
Reading, MA 01867 
Management 



JUDITH N. JONES 
55 Railroad Avenue 
Hackensack, NJ 07601 
Sociology 



SHARON A. HEARD 
1 72 Ashmun Street 
New Haven, CT 06511 
Psychology, Management 



CHERYL HUNTER 
140-2 Debs Place 
Bronx, NY 10475 
Education, Sociology 



LORI B. JOYCE 
14 Cottage Street 
Medway, MA 02053 
International Management 



184 



LESLIE JUNDA 
50 Chiltern Road 
Weston, MA 02193 
Management, Finance 



CINDY M. KNOLLER 
2121 Avenue J 
Brooklyn, NY 11210 
Nutrition 



GERTRUDE M. LECLAIRE 
Gaskill Street 
Mendon, MA 01756 
Human Services, Psychology 



JOANNE A. KABERIDIS 
65 Selwyn Street 
Roslindale, MA 02131 
Mathematics, Economics 



KAREN A. KNOWLES 
1 Wabon Street 
Boston, MA 02121 
Elementary Education 



SHOU WAN LEONG 
123 Winnisimmet Street 
Chelsea, MA 02150 
Spanish 



DOMNA S. KARAGOGEOS 
34 Orestou Street 
Thessaloniki, Greece 
Biology, Chemistry 



KATHERINE KOO 
C68 Bellevue Court 
41 Stubbs Road 
Hong Kong 
Communications, Art 



CYNTHIA R. LEVEILLE 
7 Walnut Street 
Turners Falls, MA 01376 
Biology 



CINDY B. KELLER 
25 Baskin Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 
Retail Management 



WENDY L. KOSOVSKY 
49 Seminole Circle 
West Hartford, CT 06117 
Psychology 



MONICA B. LEVINE 
359 Tiffany Street 
Springfield, MA 01108 
Human Services 



ELLEN KELLY 
949 Long Hill Road 
Guilford, CT 06437 
Physical Therapy 



LISA M. LAMB 

9 Colbourne Crescent 

Brookline, MA 02146 

Management 



RENE F. LEVINE 
41 Harvard Street 
Maiden, MA 02148 
Government, Management 



PATRICIA A. KELLY 
29 Judy Terrace 
Massapequa, NY 11762 
Chemistry, Biology 



LISA-MARIA LANZILLO 
Ferncroft Tower 
208A Ferncroft Drive 
Danvers, MA 01923 
Communications 



WENDY H. LEVINE 

19 Sims Road 

Quincy, MA 02170 

Special and Elementary Education 



MILDRED J. KIMBREL 
70 Astoria Street 
Mattapan, MA 02126 
Government 



DIANE C. LAROSSA 
72 Kennilworth Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 
French, Government 



SHERYL A. LEVITT 

75 Lovett Road 

Newton Center, MA 02159 

Early Childhood Education 



GLENDINE KINGSBURY 
1 1 2 Jersey Street Apt. 1 
Boston, MA 02215 
Mathematics 



LUCIA L. LATHAM 
7 Western Avenue 
Essex, MA 01929 
Nursing 



CYNTHIA LEWIS 
700 Beacon Street 
Newton, MA 02159 



JOAN KIRSCHNER 
106 Clark Street 
Easthampton, MA 01027 
Nutrition 



MARIE T. LEBER 
52 Alleghany Street 
Roxbury, MA 02120 
Nutrition 



JOANNE LINCOLN 

3 Scotsdale Road 

South Burlington, VT 05401 

Open 



MARY KISSEL 
6232 Nevenhain 
Sophienrune, Germany 



JANE R. LEBLANC 
77 Cabot Street 
Waltham, MA 02154 
Nursing 



ELLEN M. LISAK 
14 Dighton Street 
Brighton, MA 02135 
Philosophy 



185 



MICHELLE LOPEZ 
4040 Ely Avenue 
Bronx, NY 10466 



LUCY B. MASTERS 

409 Commonwealth Avenue 

Boston, MA 02215 

Communications 



JOAN M. MCLAUGHLIN 

30 Tunxis Road 

West Hartford, CT 06107 

Communications 



MEGAN LYNCH 
36 Sohier Street 
Cohasset, MA 02025 
Communications 



DEBORAH MAYERSON 
8 Atherton Circle 
Lynnfield, MA 
Education 



ANN T. MCNULTY 
30 Hamilton Street Apt. 26 
Saugus, MA 01906 
Communications, English 



JILL F. MAGOON 
101 East Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 
Nutrition 



PATRICIA MCAFEE 
3096 Ludlow Road 
Shaker Heights, OH 44120 
Communicatons 



MICHELLE K. MCNULTY 
8 Beacon Avenue 
Amsterdam, NY 12010 
Nursing 



MARILYN L. MAIONE 
15 Roosevelt Avenue 
South Hamilton, MA 01982 
Open 



KATHLEEN MCALOON 
25 Fisher Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 
Nutrition 



ADELE MCSPADDEN 
6056 N 21 Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19138 
Management, Elementary Education 



MELANIE R. MAMISHIAN 
151 School Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 
Government 



MARGARET MCCAIG 
819 Parker Street 
Roxbury, MA 02120 



Nursing 



DONNA L. MENNO 
4240 Clardon Drive 
Williamsville, NY 14221 
Physical Therapy 



RENEE A. MARCHAND 
720 Windwood Drive 
Tiverton, Rl 02878 
Physical Therapy 



JOYCE M. MCCARTHY 
5 Terrier Road 
Medford, MA 02155 
Nutrition 



ESTHER MHLANGA 
277 School Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 
Finance, Management 



PATRICIA A. MARINO 
40 Quorn Hunt Road 
West Simsbury, CT 06092 
Psychology, Human Services 



YVONNE M. GRAHAM-MCCOLL 
203 Westgate 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
Elementary and Special Education 



ROBIN S. MILDER 
24 Bates Road 
Swampscott, MA 01907 
Nursing 



SARA MARK 
231 Freeman Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 
English, Education 



ROSEMARY MCCORMACK 
26 Willowford Road 
South Dennis, MA 02660 
Physical Therapy 



JOAN D. MILLER 
416 Sisson Court 
Silver Spring, MD 20902 
Communications 



JANE MARKHAM 
58 Orient Avenue 
Melrose, MA 02176 



PATRICIA A. MCGRORY 
5 Woodfield Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122 
Economics 



RHONDA D. MILLS 
572 East 24 Street 
Paterson, NJ 07514 
Communications 



SUSAN L. MARONA 
33 Forestdale Road 
Paxton, MA 01612 
Mathematics, Physics 



CAROL A. MCHUGH 
926 South Street 
Dalton, MA 01226 
Nursing 



MELITTA M. MODESTI 
27 Lynacres Boulevard 
Fayetteville, NY 13066 
Nursing 



186 



SHARON MOIDEL 
874 Howard Avenue 
Bridgeport, CT 06605 
Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education 



CAREN NAGLE 
56 Greenough Street Apt. 5 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Retail Management 



JEANNE PALAIS 
90 Edwards Street 
Portland, ME 04102 
English 



MARTHA J. MONAHAN 
141 Jersey Street 
Marblehead, MA 01945 
Psychology 



RIKA NAKAO 
5 13 15 Takiyama 
Higashikurume-shi 
Tokyo, Japan 
Economics 



MARGARET J. PALKOVIC 
85 Clearview Avenue 
Portsmouth, Rl 02871 
Physical Therapy 



MARILYN A. MONROE 
4 David Circle 
Windsor, CT 06095 
Medical Technology 



ANNE M. NEELON 
23 Cherry Lane 
Scituate, MA 02055 
Psychology, Secondary Education 



CORRINE M. PALMER 
1 Pine Grove Road 
Exeter, NH 03833 
Public Relations 



ALLISON S. MOORE 
6810 Locklenna Lane 
Palos Verdes, CA 90274 
Open 



ANN A. NICKOLDS 
36 Rossmore Road 
Lynnfield, MA 01940 
Communications 



EKATERINI PAPAGIANNOPOULOS 
22 Creighton Street 
Cambridge, MA 02140 
Nursing 



LESLIE A. MUNRO 

64 Beverly Road 

Upper Montclair, NJ 07043 

Physical Therapy 



SUZANNE M. NUTTALL 
36 Glen Road 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Nutrition 



HELEN PAPAKYRIKOS 
89 Galen Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 
Nutrition 



ANN W. MURPHY 
550 Ashmont Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122 
Mathematics 



MARY H. O'BRIEN 
22 Brown Street 
Peabody, MA 01960 
Nutrition, Psychology 



SUSAN E. PARSONS 
232 Dunnlea Road 
Fairfield, CT 06430 
Psychology, English 



DONNA J. MURPHY 
14 Donnybrook Road 
Brighton, MA 02135 
Management 



JANET M. O'FLAHERTY 
142 Woodruff Road 
Farmington, CT 06032 
Education 



DEBRA A. PEARLSTEIN 
92 Arlington Road 
Brookline, MA 02167 
Communications, Retail Management 



MARY K. MURPHY 
1 1 7 Hatton Drive 
Severna Park, MD 21146 
Nursing 



LILI A. O'HALLORAN 
5 Eaton Drive 
Waterville, ME 04901 
Retail Management 



GAIL I. PFEIFER 
1 75 Freeman Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Retail Management 



MELANIE A. MURPHY 
138 Playstead Road 
Medford, MA 02155 
History, Government 



MARCIA L. OSTERMAN 
40 West Street 
Reading, MA 01867 
Nursing 



JOANNE M. PHELAN 
44 Orchard Street 
Medfield, MA 02052 
Physical Therapy 



SUSAN E. MURPHY 

46 Clark Road 

South Weymouth, MA 02190 

Mathematics, Economics 



BARBARA L. PACKARD 
125 Parker Hill 
Boston, MA 
Mathematics 



VALERIE PHILBRICK 
94 A Lincoln Street 
Millinotet, ME 04462 
Communications 



187 



CATHY PHILLIPS 
731 Huntington Avenue 
Plainfield, NJ 07060 
Psychology 



DENISE C. RICHARDSON 
17310 Mockingbird Road 
Riverside, CA 92504 
Music, Communications 



SUSAN A. ROUNDS 
Mt. Hygeia Road 
Foster, Rl 02825 
Nursing 



CATHERINE L. PICKLE 
14 Country Lane 
South Hadley, MA 01075 
Nutrition 



ANDREA M. RIFF 
239 Allston Street 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
Biology, Chemistry 



VITORIA R. RUGO 
485 Blue Hills Parkway 
Milton, MA 02186 
Physical Therapy 



KAREN J. POLOWCHENA 

Box 242 

Hannawa Falls, NY 13647 

Communications 



ELIZABETH C. RIMANDO 
11 Tetlon Street #18 
Boston, MA 02215 
Nursing 



PHYLLIS A. RUSSELL 

126 Davis Road 

East Hartford, CT06118 

Management 



JEAN POOLE 
253 Center Street 
Segreganset, MA 02773 
Physical Therapy 



MAUDE A. RIVA 
8 Leonard Road 
Peabody, MA 01960 
Art, Communications 



ARLENE SADEK 
555 Kappock Street 
Riverdale, NY 10463 



MARY A. POOLE 
125 Winthrop Avenue 
Wollaston, MA 02170 
Communications 



CYNTHIA G. ROBY 
1625 Fleetwood 
Troy, Ml 48098 



ELIZABETH S. SAFE 
207 King Caesar Road 
Duxbury, MA 02332 
Management 



ROBIN B. PORTMAN 
1 1 Truro Lane 
Milton, MA 02186 
Sociology, American Studies 



JEANNINE E. ROCHAT 
127 Dean Street 
Norton, MA 02766 
Communications 



SUSAN A. ST. ONGE 
36 Jenkins Road 
Burnt Hills, NY 12027 
Management, Finance 



ROBIN PORTNOI 
24 Allenby Lane 
Scotch Plains, NY 07076 



KATHLEEN M. RONAN 
32 Lincoln Road 
Brockton, MA 02410 
Nutrition 



SYRMO C. SALEMI 
271 Cornell Street 
Roslindale, MA 02131 
English, Education 



CYNTHIA A. QUINN 
72 Russell Road 
Framingham, MA 01701 
Retail Management 



KAREN L. ROSE 
1 1 Quincy Street 
Medford, MA 02155 
Nursing 



CAROL R. SALLOWAY 
1 Sheldon Road 
Marblehead, MA 01945 
Psychology 



JANET A. RAPUANO 
2027 Hartford Turnpike 
North Haven, CT 06473 
Psychology, Early Childhood 
Education 



GAIL E. ROSENBERG 
571 Burroughs Road 
Fairfield, CT 06430 
Biology 



GAIL SANDIFORD 
1 75 Catherine Street 
Westbury, NY 11590 
Nursing 



ANITA M. REINOLD 
29 Evergreen Road 
Stoneham, MA 02180 
Government 



BETSY A. ROSSEN 

23 Cambridge Terrace #2 

Cambridge, MA 02140 

Economics 



KATHRYN S. SANK 
2295 Gulf of Mexico Drive 
Longboat Key, FL 33548 
Management 



188 



KATHRYN A. SAWICKI 
107 Chestnut Street 
Gardner, MA 01440 



RHONDA B. SERESKY 
21 Kings Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
Nutrition 



LYNNE C. SIMMONS 
54 State Street 
Westerly, Rl 02891 



LILLIAN J. SAXE 
91 Pilgrim Road 
West Hartford, CT 06117 
Physical Therapy 



CARMEN G. SHEARER 
67 Columbia Road 
Dorchester, MA 02121 
Psychology 



BEVERLY A. SIMMS 
725 Shawmut Avenue 
Boston, MA 02119 
Management 



SUZANNE D. SCHNEIDERMAN 
141-16 28 Avenue 
Flushing, NY 11354 
Management 



CAROL A. SHERMAN 
740 Whittemore Street 
Leicester, MA 01524 
Nursing 



JAYNE SKOLNICK 
23 Cornell Street 
West Orange, NJ 07052 
Management 



LAURA S. SCHONBERGER 
195 Fern Street 
Westwood, NJ 07675 
Human Services 



LINDA SHERMONT 
139 Summit Avenue 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Retail Management 



KIMBERLY SLAVIN 
55 Woolson Street 
Watertown, MA 06795 
Management 



EMILY W. SCOTT 
18 Rock Spring Road 
West Orange, NJ 07052 
Retail Management 



KAREN A. SHIPLEY 
1 1 7 Sutton Road 
Needham, MA 02192 
Nursing 



CATHERINE L. SMITH 
1 7 Shorewood Road 
Marblehead, MA 01945 
Biology 



ABBY G. SEARS 
6 Gardiner Road 
Toronto Ontario Canada 
Medical Technology 



ROBIN B. SHIPMAN 
18 Hemlock Terrace 
Springfield, NJ 07081 
Human Services 



SUSAN A. STEIN 
16 Tamarack Road 
Weston, MA 02193 
English, Education 



JANIS H. SEGAL 
182 St. Paul Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Communications 



AMY J. SHORT 
225 Farm Street 
Millis, MA 02054 
Nursing 



TOBY R. STEINBERG 
1 094 Centre Street 
Newton Centre, MA 02159 
Management 



NANCY A. SEIDEMAN 
38 Henry Street 
Shrewsbury, NJ 07701 
Communications 



SITHOLE SIKHULULEKILE 
481 Sillox Close 
Houghton Park 
Salisbury Rodesia 



ALICE STEINMULLER 
252 Ocean Street 
Lynn, MA 01902 
Communications 



NANCY J. SELIG 
59 Ardmore Road 
Needham, MA 02194 
Communications 



WENDY B. SILVER 
137 Grannis Road 
Orange, CT 06477 
Nursing 



HAZEL M. STEVENS 
62 Charlotte Street 
Dorchester, MA 02121 
Human Services 



JEANNE C. SERAFIN 
648 Avenue A 
Bayonne, NJ 07002 
Biology 



LINDA A. SILVERMAN 
60 Mill Street 
Westwood, MA 02090 
Psychology 



SUSAN STRAUSS 
1213 Ninth Street 
Lake Charles, LA 70761 
French 



189 



ELIZABETH STRICKLER 
110 Rollingwood Lane 
Concord, MA 01742 



BARBARA A. TOMOROWITZ 
473 Chestnut Hill Avenue 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Communications, Public Reltaions 



JULIE M. ULVVICK 
4 Lakeview Terrace 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Nursing 



ELLEN M. SULLIVAN 
38 Bradford Road 
Milton, MA 02186 
Nursing 



ANNE TRAGERT 
161 Essex Street 
Middleton, MA 01949 
Physical Therapy 



ANGELA M. VALVO 
44 Princeton Street 
Medford, MA 02155 
Physical Therapy 



LOIS H. SULLIVAN 
88 Westwood Drive 
Middlebury, CT 06762 
Nursing 



MAUREEN TREBBE 
22A Mill Street 
Woburn, MA 01801 



LESLIE VAN KIRK 
1552 Cambridge Street 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
Psychology 



MARY E. SULLIVAN 
627 Washington Avenue 
Wilmette, IL 60091 
Communications 



PEGGY A. TROUNSTINE 
2585 Grandin Road 
Cincinnati, OH 45208 
Psychology, Philosophy 



SUSAN J. VANDER VELDE 
50 High Street 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Elementary Education 



STEPHANIE TARANTINO 
12 Cushing Street 
Newton, MA 02161 
Nursing 



DEBORAH J. TRURAN 

Rte. 49 

Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Elementary and Special Education 



SUZANNE M. VOKE 
20 Longbow Road 
Lynnfield, MA 01940 
Government 



SHARON L. TARR 
1 00 Maybrook Road 
Waterbury, CT 06708 
Nursing 



LINDA SAU-LING TSANG 
Apartado 336 
Alajuela, Costa Rica 
English, Spanish 



JANICE K. WAGNER 

P.O. Box 2463 

St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 00801 

Psychology 



DIANA TELLER 
115 Brook Street 
Wellesley, MA 02181 
Psychology 



CHERYL TUCKER 
3842 N 16 Street 
Philadelphia, PA 
Elementary Education 



DARCELLE WALKER 
1 30 Devon Street 
Dorchester, MA 02121 
Secondary Education, English 



ROZENA THOMAS 
540 West 145 Street 
New York, NY 10031 
History, Government 



ABIGAIL H. TURNER 
27 Brook Road 
Weston, MA 02193 
Elementary Education, History 



NORANN E. WARNER 
74 Simonds Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 
Retail Management 



ANNE J. THRUELSEN 
Coult Lane 
Old Lyme, CT 06371 
Management, Finance 



ELIZABETH K. TURNER 
27 Brook Road 
Weston, MA 02193 
Economics, History 



NANCY G. WATSON 
1 1 9-43 200 Street 
St. Albans, NY 11412 
Retail Management 



SARAH M. TOBIN 
177 Great Plain Avenue 
Needham, MA 02192 
Nursing 



SUSAN W. TYE 
64 Nonantum Road 
Brighton, MA 02135 
Nursing 



KAREN A. WEBBER 
27 Brooklawn Road 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 
Communications, Management 



190 



KAREN B. WEGIEL 
20 Lynnwood Drive 
Longmeadow, MA 01 106 
Nutrition 



MARTHA D. WOODBRIDGE 
85 East Laurel Avenue 
Lake Forest, IL 60045 
Graphic Design 



LINDA J. WENC 
55 Stevens Street 
Windsor Locks, CT 06096 
Biology 



MARGARET A. WOODRUFF 
61 Langmaid Lane 
Bradford, PA 16701 
Retail Management 



SHARON M. WHITE 
30 Lois Street 
Leominster, MA 01453 
Nutrition 



ALINE A. YAMASHITA 

502 Thomas Street 

Jonestown 

Tamuning, Guam 96911 

Human Services, Early Childhood 

Education 



ELIZABETH A. WHITNEY 
24 Boulevard 
Newtown, CT 06470 
Economics 



ELLEN F. YEE 

258 Huron Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

Economics 



LINDA D. WILLEY 
43 Wiley Street 
Bangor, ME 04401 
Nursing 



CATHERINE E. YESAIR 
Johnson Lane 
Byfield, MA 01922 
French 



LAURA D. WILLIAMS 
215 Dessa Drive 
Hamden, CT 06517 
Nursing 



TERESA A. YOUNG 
2141 Oriole Avenue 
Spring Hill, FL 33512 
Home Economics Education 



LANA N. WILLIAMS 
7 Yale Street 
Winchester, MA 01890 
Management 



NANCY A. ZAHKA 
239 Colwell Drive 
Dedham, MA 02026 
Psychology 



ROBERTA WILSON 
Hillcrest Road RR #3 
Blockville Ontario Canada 
Graphic Design 



CHERYL ZELERMEYER 
210 Lafayette Street 
Salem, MA 01970 



JILL A. WINITZER 

283 Hammond Pond Parkway 

Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 

Communications 



ELLEN ZELNICK 
2637 National Drive 
Brooklyn, NY 11234 
Retail Management 



RIGA WINTHROP 
1 5 Howe Street 
Wellesley, MA 02181 



MELISSA H. ZIMMERMAN 
60 Wadsworth Street #4A 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
Nutrition 



191 



Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. John Amodio 

The Andersons 

Mr. and Mrs. Elzaw Axon, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burleigh E. Barnes 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Bergstresser 

Mrs. Frances R. Blacher 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Botindari 

William Wallace Bouchard 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Bray 

Kenneth and Elizabeth Brighton 

Mrs. Laura Brigida 

Fred and Pearl Brown 

Lt. Col. and Mrs. Robert B. Burns 

Mr. and Mrs, Gerald T. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. Ciciola 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund R. Crawford 

President J.K. Cummiskey 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Dammert 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Davis 

Max and Magda Degen 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Diamond 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo DiVerdi 

Dix Chicks 

Mr. and Mrs. Grover A. DuBose 

Richard English 

Mrs. Carl R. Erickson 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Falk 

Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Farina 

Mr. and Mrs. Sabino C. Flores 

Rachel Zinober Forman 



Mr. and Mrs. Hugh D. Gardner, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Garthwait 

Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Gersin 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred D. Gross 

Richard A. Guenther, M.D. 

Marju Harriman 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Edwin Harsfield 

Dr. and Mrs. William J. Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. Thrasivoulos Kaberidis 

Mrs. June Kingsbury 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex M. T. Koo 

Patricia A. Kreutler 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lamb 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. LaRossa 

Barney and Anne Levine 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Levine 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Len Libman 

Mary V. McNulty 

Charles Mackey 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Marino 

Ellen McCaig 

Priscilla L. McKee 

Paul R. Miller 

Rose Moidel 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl Monahan 

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Moore 

Ms. Charlotte Morocco 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Murphy 



Mrs. Dorothy Neelon and Family 

Prof. Georgia T. Noble 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Palkovic 

Mr. and Mrs. George Palmer 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Portnoi 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Rapuano 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Rosenberg 

Mrs. Albert C. Rugo 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. St. Onge 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Sawicki 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Scott 

Phyllis and Clifford Seresky 

Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Shochet 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Short 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward N. Silver 

Simmons Asian Students Club (CSC) 

Social Activities Committee 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton A. Tarr 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Trounstine 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Cort Turner III 

Dr. and Mrs. W.E. Vander Velde 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Webber 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Wegiel 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. White 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Willey 



192 



, .. 




193 



HAVE A PEPSI DAY! 




Pepsi-Cola Bottling Group of Boston, MA 



SmiTHHRLLHfiS 

m marvelous, mesmerizing, 
mysterious, memorable, 
I independent, idealistic, 
ingenious, infallible, 
T terrific, tasteful, 
tactful, tempting, 
H honest, happy, 
huggable, humorous 

...women 



College Stores Associates 

wishes the Class of 1978 

the best of luck!!! 



194 



The Alumnae Association of Simmons College 
congratulates the Class of 1978 

and 
extends a cordial welcome to 
the Young Alumnae Council 

and 
the Simmons Alumnae Clubs. 



195 



OFFICE 
287-1200 



G 



Grimes Oil Co. Inc. 

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING 



KERN GRIMES 
PRESIDENT 



165 NORFOLK ST. 
BOSTON, MASS. 02124 



COMPLIMENTS OF: 



The Boston Five Cents 
Savings Bank 

435 Brookline Ave. 
Boston, Mass. 02215 



Tel. #277-581 3 



John L. Stracuzzi 
Branch Officer 



Commercial & 
Industrial Waste 



361-8000 



JOSEPH AMARA & SONS 

INC. 



200 PROVIDENCE ST. 
HYDE PARK, MASS. 02136 



Modern Compaction Units 



All Size 
Containers 



METROPOLITAN 
PETROLEUM COMPANY, 

INC. 



500 Neponset Avenue 

Boston, Mass. 02122 

288-1100 



196 




Best Wishes 

to the Class of 1978 
from the Class of 1978 



o^» 




PRf^NUPTIA De Pans BRIDALS, INC. 
154 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02116 



536-0666 



BELLA D.HALL 




A 



SALON 



BOSTON • 508 COMMONWEALTH AVE. • 617-261-1313 
BRAINTREE • 900 WASHINGTON ST. • 617-848-7686 



197 



GOOD LUCK CLASS OF 1978 



from 



CLASS OF 1979 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



JOHN AMODIO 

AMODIO MOVING & 

STORAGE 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



WORLD WIDE MOVING AND WAREHOUSING 



To the Class of 1978: 

Congratulations, 
Good Luck and Best Wishes 
for the future 

from the Class of 1980 



All the best to our friends 
in the Class of 1978. 



Judy and Sarah 



198 



Congratulations and 

Best Wishes Always 

To The Class of 1978!! 



From the Student Government 
Association of 1977-1978. 



Trish, Michele, Alice, Joyce, Patti, Debbie, 
Barbara, Joann and Woodrina 

— Thanks for all your help and support — 



Best Wishes Class of 1978 

Compliments 
of 

SIDELINES 



One fact cannot be refuted 
We cared that you commuted. 

Good wishes to the Class of '78 
from 

Commuter Organization 



199 



Remember September of '74? 

Three hundred twenty-five of you arrived at our door. 
A month or so earlier, while you had been packing 
So was Dick Nixon, who'd lost all his backing. 

Your first year at Simmons is known in our annals 
As when Mellon donations paid for some panels. 
And our Graduate Program in Management's creation 
Was lauded in press reports o'er the nation. 

When you were sophomores, a matter of PRIDE 
Was launched, and we hoped that if we really tried 
We could raise lots of money, and instead of just dreaming 
Build a new Commons and set this old college gleaming. 

That following Fall, what looked like destruction 

Was actually just the first phase of construction. 

That year you were juniors was quite widely noted 

As this land's Bicentennial, and also we voted. 

The winners, in addition to Walter and Jimmy 

Were senior class officers — Barb, Jayne, Liz and Kimmer. 

And then you were seniors and came back to view 
The sparkling new Commons, a real dream come true. 
After break, you really earned your B.S. and B.A.'s 
By learning to travel through the main building maze. 

Then came the blizzard, and for weeks we all felt 
That perhaps by Commencement the snow would all melt. 
But it did, and it's Spring and that Commencement Day 
Of our seventy-fifth birthday has faded away. 

And now all our best, whether job or more school, 
As off you go, out to a world not so cruel. 

— Peggy Loeb 



200 






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